Recommended Books

10 Best Books for Biomathematics and Biostatistics

For anyone looking for a readable alternative to the usual unwieldy calculus text, here's a concise, no-nonsense approach to learning calculus. Following...

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This article writter by SouravBio on July 01, 2021

Writer and Founder of Microbiologynote.com. I am from India and my main purpose is to provide you a strong understanding of Microbiology.

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Ziehl Neelsen Stain Principle, Procedure, Result.
Ziehl Neelsen Stain Principle, Procedure, Result.

1. Understanding Calculus

Author: by H. S. Bear (Author)

Everything you need to know-basic essential concepts-about calculus

For anyone looking for a readable alternative to the usual unwieldy calculus text, here’s a concise, no-nonsense approach to learning calculus. Following up on the highly popular first edition of Understanding Calculus, Professor H. S. Bear offers an expanded, improved edition that will serve the needs of every mathematics and engineering student, or provide an easy-to-use refresher text for engineers.

Understanding Calculus, Second Edition provides in a condensed format all the material covered in the standard two-year calculus course. In addition to the first edition’s comprehensive treatment of one-variable calculus, it covers vectors, lines, and planes in space; partial derivatives; line integrals; Green’s theorem; and much more. More importantly, it teaches the material in a unique, easy-to-read style that makes calculus fun to learn. By explaining calculus concepts through simple geometric and physical examples rather than formal proofs, Understanding Calculus, Second Edition, makes it easy for anyone to master the essentials of calculus.

If the dry “theorem-and-proof” approach just doesn’t work, and the traditional twenty pound calculus textbook is just too much, this book is for you.

2. Introduction to Mathematics for Life Scientists (Springer Study Edition)

Author: by Edward Batschelet (Author)

From the reviews: “…Here we have a book which we can wholeheartedly suggest. The mathematics is sound and pared to essentials; the examples are an impressive, well-chosen selection from the biomathematics literature, and the problem sets provide both useful exercises and some fine introductions to the art of modeling… Batschelet has written an introduction to biomathematics which is notable for its clarity – not only a clarity of presentation, but also a clarity of purpose, backed by a sure grasp of the field…” #Bulletin of Mathematical Biology#1 “For research workers in the biomedical field who feel a need for freshening up their knowledge in mathematics, but so far have always been frustrated by either too formal or too boring textbooks, there is now exactly what they would like to have: an easy to read introduction. This book is highly motivating for practical workers because only those mathematical techniques are offered for which there is an application in the life sciences. The reader will find it stimulating that each tool described is immediately exemplified by problems from latest publications

3. Statistics for the Life Sciences

Author: by Myra Samuels (Author), Jeffrey Witmer (Author), Andrew Schaffner (Author)

The Fifth Edition of Statistics for the Life Sciences uses authentic examples and exercises from a wide variety of life science domains to give statistical concepts personal relevance, enabling students to connect concepts with situations they will encounter outside the classroom. The emphasis on understanding ideas rather than memorizing formulas makes the text ideal for students studying a variety of scientific fields: animal science, agronomy, biology, forestry, health, medicine, nutrition, pharmacy, physical education, zoology and more. In the fifth edition, randomization tests have been moved to the fore to motivate the inference procedures introduced in the text. There are no prerequisites for the text except elementary algebra.

KEY TOPICS: Description of Samples and Populations; Probability and the Binomial Distribution; The Normal Distribution; Sampling Distributions; Confidence Intervals; Comparison of Two Independent Samples; Comparison of Paired Samples; Categorical Data: One-Sample Distributions; Categorical Data: Relationships; Comparing the Means of Many Independent Samples; Linear Regression and Correlation; A Summary of Inference Methods

KEY MARKET: For readers interested in statistics as it pertains to life science.

4. Biostatistics: A Foundation for Analysis in the Health Sciences, 10e Student Solutions Manual

Author: by Wayne W. Daniel (Author)

Solutions and explanations for problems in Biostatistics

Biostatistics: A Foundation for Analysis in the Health Sciences, 10th Edition ― Student Solutions Manual offers complete solutions to the odd-numbered practice problems in the text. Each answer includes all graphs and tables as required, and detailed explanations accompany more complex answers as needed. Biostatistics problems can become complicated very quickly, and practice is the only way to master some of the more difficult scenarios. By helping you see just where you went wrong, and providing the reasoning behind the correct answer, this solutions manual helps you study more effectively and retain vital information.

5. Causal Analysis in Biomedicine and Epidemiology: Based on Minimal Sufficient Causation (Chapman & Hall/CRC Biostatistics Series Book 9)

Author: by Mikel Aickin (Author)

“Provides current models, tools, and examples for the formulation and evaluation of scientific hypotheses in causal terms. Introduces a new method of model parametritization. Illustrates structural equations and graphical elements for complex causal systems.”

6. Biostatistics: A Computing Approach (Chapman & Hall/CRC Biostatistics Series)

Author: by Stewart Anderson (Author)

The emergence of high-speed computing has facilitated the development of many exciting statistical and mathematical methods in the last 25 years, broadening the landscape of available tools in statistical investigations of complex data. Biostatistics: A Computing Approach focuses on visualization and computational approaches associated with both modern and classical techniques. Furthermore, it promotes computing as a tool for performing both analyses and simulations that can facilitate such understanding.

As a practical matter, programs in R and SAS are presented throughout the text. In addition to these programs, appendices describing the basic use of SAS and R are provided. Teaching by example, this book emphasizes the importance of simulation and numerical exploration in a modern-day statistical investigation. A few statistical methods that can be implemented with simple calculations are also worked into the text to build insight about how the methods really work.

Suitable for students who have an interest in the application of statistical methods but do not necessarily intend to become statisticians, this book has been developed from Introduction to Biostatistics II, which the author taught for more than a decade at the University of Pittsburgh.

7. Mathematical Biology: I. An Introduction (Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics, 17)

Author: by James D. Murray (Author)

Mathematical Biology is a richly illustrated textbook in an exciting and fast growing field. Providing an in-depth look at the practical use of math modeling, it features exercises throughout that are drawn from a variety of bioscientific disciplines – population biology, developmental biology, physiology, epidemiology, and evolution, among others. It maintains a consistent level throughout so that graduate students can use it to gain a foothold into this dynamic research area.

8. Nonlinear Oscillations in Biology and Chemistry: Proceedings of a meeting held at the University of Utah, May 9–11, 1985 (Lecture Notes in Biomathematics, 66)

Author: by Hans G. Othmer (Editor) 

This volume contains the proceedings of a meeting entitled ‘Nonlinear Oscillations in Biology and Chemistry’, which was held at the University of Utah May 9-11,1985. The papers fall into four major categories: (i) those that deal with biological problems, particularly problems arising in cell biology, (ii) those that deal with chemical systems, (iii) those that treat problems which arise in neurophysiology, and (iv), those whose primary emphasis is on more general models and the mathematical techniques involved in their analysis. Except for the paper by Auchmuty, all are based on talks given at the meeting. The diversity of papers gives some indication of the scope of the meeting, but the printed word conveys neither the degree of interaction between the participants nor the intellectual sparks generated by that interaction. The meeting was made possible by the financial support of the Department of Mathe­ matics of the University of Utah. I am indebted to Ms. Toni Bunker of the Department of Mathematics for her very able assistance on all manner of details associated with the organization of the meeting. Finally, a word of thanks to all participants for their con­ tributions to the success of the meeting, and to the contributors to this volume for their efforts in preparing their manuscripts.

9. Applications Of Calculus To Biology And Medicine: Case Studies From Lake Victoria

Author: by Nathan Ryan (Author), Dorothy I Wallace (Author)

Biology majors and pre-health students at many colleges and universities are required to take a semester of calculus but rarely do such students see authentic applications of its techniques and concepts. Applications of Calculus to Biology and Medicine: Case Studies from Lake Victoria is designed to address this issue: it prepares students to engage with the research literature in the mathematical modeling of biological systems, assuming they have had only one semester of calculus. The text includes projects, problems and exercises: the projects ask the students to engage with the research literature, problems ask the students to extend their understanding of the materials and exercises ask the students to check their understanding as they read the text. Students who successfully work their way through the text will be able to engage in a meaningful way with the research literature to the point that they would be able to make genuine contributions to the literature.

10. Biology by Numbers: An Encouragement to Quantitative Thinking

Author: by Richard F. Burton (Author)

This textbook is both an introduction to quantitative biology and a guide for the number-shy. Richard Burton fosters a sense of the fundamental importance and usefulness of mathematical principles in biology, with a fascinating range of examples. The book is geared toward the nonmathematician, and covers the basics as well as various more advanced topics from many diverse biological disciplines. Questions and calculations encourage active participation without holding up the casual reader. A key feature is the structure of the book. Rather than building it around biological disciplines, Dr. Burton emphasizes the common ways of reasoning used in areas as diverse as insect and population growth, seed mortality, and sensory response (to mention a few that use logarithms).

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Writer and Founder of Microbiologynote.com. I am from India and my main purpose is to provide you a strong understanding of Microbiology.

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