9 Min Read

Centrifuge Blood Sample – Purpose, Steps, Techniques

What are the components of blood? Blood is a fluid tissue that circulates throughout the body and performs a number of important functions. It is ...

Photo of author

Sourav Bio

What are the components of blood?

Blood is a fluid tissue that circulates throughout the body and performs a number of important functions. It is made up of several components, including cells and plasma.

Cells:

  1. Red blood cells (erythrocytes): These cells are responsible for carrying oxygen from the lungs to the body’s tissues. They are flexible and have a biconcave shape, which allows them to squeeze through small blood vessels.
  2. White blood cells (leukocytes): These cells are part of the immune system and help defend the body against infections and other foreign substances. There are several types of white blood cells, including neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes.
  3. Platelets (thrombocytes): These small, irregularly shaped cells are involved in blood clotting. When a blood vessel is damaged, platelets clump together to form a plug that stops the bleeding.

Plasma: Plasma is the liquid portion of the blood that carries the cells and other substances throughout the body. It is made up of water, proteins, sugars, and other substances. Some of the proteins in plasma include:

  1. Albumin: This protein helps maintain the proper balance of fluids in the body.
  2. Globulins: These proteins are involved in immune function and include antibodies that help fight infections.
  3. Fibrinogen: This protein is involved in blood clotting. When a blood vessel is damaged, fibrinogen is converted to fibrin, which helps form a clot.
  4. Enzymes: Plasma contains a number of enzymes that are involved in various chemical reactions in the body.

Overall, blood is a complex and vital substance that plays a critical role in maintaining the health and function of the body.

Centrifuge Blood Sample - Purpose, Steps, Techniques
components of blood | Image Source: capp.dk

What are the components of blood plasma?

Blood plasma is the liquid portion of the blood that carries the cells and other substances throughout the body. It is made up of water, proteins, sugars, and other substances. Some of the main components of blood plasma include:

  1. Water: Plasma is mostly made up of water, which helps to transport nutrients, hormones, and other substances throughout the body.
  2. Proteins: Plasma contains a number of different proteins, including albumin, globulins, fibrinogen, and enzymes. These proteins have a variety of functions, including maintaining the proper balance of fluids in the body, participating in immune function, and helping to form blood clots.
  3. Sugars: Plasma contains small amounts of sugars, such as glucose, which are used as a source of energy by the body’s cells.
  4. Hormones: Plasma carries hormones, such as insulin and thyroid hormones, which regulate various bodily functions.
  5. Nutrients: Plasma transports nutrients, such as amino acids, fatty acids, and electrolytes, to the body’s cells.
  6. Waste products: Plasma carries waste products, such as carbon dioxide and urea, away from the body’s cells to be eliminated.

Overall, plasma is a complex and vital component of the blood that plays a critical role in maintaining the health and function of the body.

Purpose of Blood Separation

Each sort of blood cell has its own purpose and function. Blood component separation allows scientists to investigate individual cell types. Some blood components can be utilised to diagnose diseases, while others can be used to gain a deeper knowledge of the human immune response. Blood separation enables scientists to examine the target cell population without interference from other cell types.

Separation of blood into its components

Blood separation tests are regularly performed in diagnostic laboratories to screen for the presence of disease indicators or to prepare for transfusions. Each blood component has a distinct purpose, and separating them may be important for precise diagnosis or effective treatment applications. The distinct densities of blood components are frequently utilised by scientists to build blood separation techniques. These blood separation techniques enable diagnostic laboratories to accurately analyse each blood component, resulting in improved patient outcomes. Although the separation of blood into its components is not a goal in and of itself, it is a crucial first step that serves as the basis for a number of essential diagnostic and research operations.

Blood separation techniques

There are several techniques that are used to separate the various components of blood, such as cells and plasma. These techniques are often used in medical laboratories and research settings to analyze blood samples and study various aspects of blood function. Some common blood separation techniques include:

  1. Centrifugation: This technique uses a machine called a centrifuge to spin the blood sample at a high speed, causing the heavier cells, such as red blood cells, to separate from the lighter cells, such as platelets. The separated cells can then be collected and analyzed.
  2. Filtration: This technique uses filters with specific pore sizes to separate the cells from the plasma. The cells are too large to pass through the pores, so they are retained on the filter, while the plasma passes through.
  3. Dextran sedimentation: This technique uses a chemical called dextran to separate the cells from the plasma. The dextran is mixed with the blood sample, and the resulting solution is placed in a tube and allowed to sit. The cells are heavier than the dextran solution, so they settle to the bottom of the tube, while the plasma remains at the top.
  4. Agarose gel electrophoresis: This technique uses an electric current to separate proteins in the blood based on their size and charge. The proteins are placed in a gel matrix and the current is applied, causing the proteins to migrate through the gel based on their size and charge.
  5. Magnetic bead separation: This technique uses magnetic beads that are coated with specific antibodies to separate specific types of cells from the blood sample. The beads are mixed with the blood sample and are attracted to the cells that have the specific proteins that the antibodies are targeting. The beads and cells can then be separated using a magnet.

These are just a few examples of the many techniques that are used to separate the components of blood. Each technique has its own advantages and disadvantages, and the appropriate technique will depend on the specific needs and requirements of the analysis.

Blood separation using Centrifuge

Centrifugation is a technique that uses a machine called a centrifuge to spin a blood sample at a high speed and separate the heavier cells, such as red blood cells, from the lighter cells, such as platelets. Here are the general steps involved in separating blood using a centrifuge:

  1. Collect a sample of blood: A small sample of blood is typically collected using a standard venipuncture procedure. The sample should be collected in a sterile container and handled according to proper sterile technique.
  2. Prepare the sample: The collected blood sample is typically placed in a special tube that contains an anticoagulant to prevent the blood from clotting. The tube is then sealed and labeled with the necessary information, such as the patient’s name and the date.
  3. Load the sample into the centrifuge: The sealed blood sample tube is carefully loaded into the centrifuge, following the manufacturer’s instructions for the specific model.
  4. Set the speed and time: The operator sets the speed and time for the centrifugation process according to the specific requirements of the separation.
  5. Start the centrifuge: The operator activates the centrifuge to start the spinning process.
  6. Collect the separated cells: After the centrifugation process is complete, the operator carefully removes the tube from the centrifuge and collects the separated cells. The heavier cells, such as red blood cells, will be at the bottom of the tube, while the lighter cells, such as platelets, will be at the top.
  7. Dispose of the waste: The waste material, including the anticoagulant and any cellular debris, should be properly disposed of according to local regulations.

Blood separation with a swing-out rotor

Blood separation centrifuges with a swing-out rotor will allow particles to settle evenly at the tube’s bottom. After centrifugation, this method of blood separation facilitates the separation of blood components, which is one of its benefits. Utilizing reduced centrifugal forces, which minimises energy consumption, is an additional benefit of this blood separation approach. Blood separation is a popular application for swing-out rotors in medical and research laboratories.

Blood separation with a fixed-angle rotor

Some blood separation centrifuges have a fixed-angle rotor as an alternative to machines with a swing-out rotor. Blood separation machines with fixed-angle rotors spin blood components to the opposite side of the tube, where they then slide to the bottom. This blood separation method, in conjunction with the increased centrifugal forces of fixed-angle blood separation centrifuges, expedites the separation of blood. Blood separation centrifuges with fixed-angle rotors are favoured by research facilities for their studies due to the large speed advantage of these machines.

Centrifuged blood

  • Blood that has been centrifuged bears the appearance of three horizontal layers of varied hues. When a specimen tube is removed from a blood separation centrifuge, the three coloured layers are easily distinguishable. 55% of the entire blood volume is comprised of the straw-colored plasma layer, which accounts for 55% of the total blood volume.
  • The layer beneath the plasma may be white or grey in hue. This layer of centrifuged blood containing white blood cells and platelets is referred to as the Buffy coat. The lowest layer consists of red blood cells, which comprise 45 percent of the total blood volume.
  • Depending on the oxygen level of the cells, the lowest layer of centrifuged blood may be dark red or bright red in colour.
  • With the assistance of a high-quality blood separation centrifuge, such as the CAPPRondo Advanced Clinical Centrifuge CRC-416X, it is quick and simple to achieve outstanding blood separation.

How does a centrifuge separate blood?

Blood separation centrifuges function by rapidly spinning blood samples (in collection tubes). The centrifugal force is the rotating force exerted on the blood collection tubes by the high rotational speeds. When blood collection tubes are spun in a blood separation centrifuge, centrifugal force separates the various blood components based on their density and quantity inside the sample. By passing blood samples through a high-quality blood separation centrifuge, such as the CAPPRondo Basic Clinical Centrifuge, it is possible to separate the various components of blood into different layers for easier separation.

Recommended centrifuge speed for blood

The appropriate centrifuge speed for blood separation depends on the intended application of the blood. For the majority of diagnostic assays and some research applications, a centrifuge speed of 4,000 RPM would adequate, whereas 6,500 RPM would be more appropriate for the majority of research applications. The CAPPRondo Advanced Clinical Centrifuge CRC-416X with a swing-out rotor and a maximum speed of 4,000 RPM is the best blood separation centrifuge for clinical purposes. For research purposes, our preferred blood separation centrifuges with fixed-angle rotors are the CAPPRondo Basic Clinical Centrifuge CRC-658 and the CAPPRondo Advanced Clinical Centrifuge CRC-416X.

Why are white blood cells separated from red blood cells before being analyzed?

Before analysis, white blood cells are isolated from red blood cells to make their analysis easier for researchers and physicians. There are far fewer white blood cells than red blood cells in entire blood. Without an initial blood separation phase, it would be difficult for scientists to acquire white blood cells for regular clinical testing and research. Blood separation procedures typically produce a distinct layer of white blood cells, which scientists can subsequently remove for further examination. When scientists separate white blood cells from red blood cells using blood separation centrifuges, the white blood cells are located in a layer known as the Buffy coat.

Citation

APA

Sourav Bio. (December 28, 2022).Centrifuge Blood Sample – Purpose, Steps, Techniques. Retrieved from https://microbiologynote.com/centrifuge-blood-sample-purpose-steps-techniques/

MLA

Sourav Bio. "Centrifuge Blood Sample – Purpose, Steps, Techniques." Microbiology Note, Microbiologynote.com, December 28, 2022.

MCQ

?
Submit Your Question
Please submit your question in appropriate category.

Leave a Comment