Difference between hot air oven and autoclave
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Difference between hot air oven and autoclave

Through technological advances, The methods for sterilization have changed throughout the decades. There are now many different methods of sterilization employed in laboratories. However, autoclaving using steam is the most popular method for sterilization in the majority of labs. Although autoclaving is a clean rapid, reliable, and cost-effective method of sterilization, without any environmental risks and risks, it is still utilized most often in hospitals. However, there are three commonly employed methods of sterilization that are used: the steam autoclave unsaturated chemical-vapor sterilizer as well as the dry heat sterilizer. This article will only focus on steam autoclaves and dry heat sterilization techniques.

Difference Between Hypertonic and Hypotonic
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Difference Between Hypertonic vs Hypotonic

Osmosis refers to the movement of water molecules through semi-permeable membranes from high to low water potential. This semi-permeable membrane

Differences between B Cells and T Cells - B Cells vs T Cells
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Differences between B Cells and T Cells – B Cells vs T Cells

B cells and T cells are two kinds of lymphocytes involved in activating the immune system within the body. Both B and T cells are created within the bone marrow. T cells move into the thymus to develop. T cells as well as B cells play a role in the recognition of pathogens as well as other harmfulforeign substances within the body, such as parasites, viruses, bacteria and dead cells. Two types of T cells comprise called helper T cells and cytotoxic cells. 

Differences between RBC and WBC - RBC vs WBC
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Differences between RBC and WBC – RBC vs WBC

White blood cells are two of the components of the blood supply in mammals. RBCs (RBCs) are biconcave discs that are circular in shape with hemoglobin-containing pigments to carry oxygen throughout the animal's body. Oxygen is essential to the catabolism of cells within animals. A portion of carbon dioxide is transported through RBCs. They are created as a waste product in catabolism. They are also known as white blood cells. (WBCs) contain a range of types of cells like leukocytes neutrophils, and monocytes. They are able to differentiate into various defense mechanisms. The major distinction in red and white blood cells lies with their purpose that red blood cells transport oxygen around the human body, whereas white blood cells play a role with the protection of animals by destroying pathogens that attack the body's cells.

Differences between Humoral Immunity and Cell mediated Immunity
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Differences between Humoral Immunity and Cell mediated Immunity

Cell-mediated immunity and immunological immunity are two kinds of adaptive immune responses which allow the human body to protect itself in a targeted manner against harmful substances such as viruses, bacteria and contaminants. While there is some overlap between the two parts of the immune response and both are based on the function of lymphoid cell function - there are some significant distinctions.

Differences between Serum and Plasma - Serum vs Plasma
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Differences between Serum and Plasma – Serum vs Plasma

Plasma and serum are two blood derivatives which do not have blood cells such as red blood cells white blood cells and platelets. Both are enriched with proteins, drugs hormones, toxins and electrolytes. Both plasma and serum can be used to treat and diagnose. They are separated from blood using centrifugation, which eliminates the blood's cellular component. Blood is infused with anticoagulants when it has been transfused to stop the clotting. The serum color is amber, while the plasma color is straw. The primary difference between serum as well as plasma lies in the fact that the latter is a protein-rich liquid that separates when blood is coagulated, whereas plasma forms the liquid part of blood that holds blood cells suspended.

Hypersensitivity Type I, II, III and IV- Summary in table form
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Hypersensitivity Type I, II, III and IV- Summary in table form

Hypersensitivity (also known as hypersensitivity response or intolerance) is a term used to describe undesirable reactions that are caused by the immune system, which includes autoimmunity and allergies. These are typically called an overreaction of the immune system, and these reactions can be harmful and uncomfortable. It is an immunologic term , and should not be misinterpreted as a psychiatric term of being hypersensitive, which refers that a person is hypersensitive to physical (ie sounds, touch light, sound, etc.) or emotional stimuli. However, there is a link between the two , studies have demonstrated that with ADHD (a mental disorders) tend to experience hypersensitivity reactions, such as asthma, allergies, or eczema and more than people who don't have ADHD.